Animal Connections - Integrative Care, P.A.
Animal Connections Integrative Care Blog

Obesity in our pets

Obesity is an issue that affects our pets as much as it does us. Inactivity and too many calories lead to weight gain. This will affect the health and wellbeing of our pet. Overweight animals are at an increased risk for diabetes melitis. The usual treatment is daily injections of insulin, but in some cases, animals that get down to a healthy weight can be weaned off of the insulin. Extra weight will cause unnecessary stress on joints. The most common joint affected being the stifle (knee) joint, which can result in a rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament.   

Free choice feeding may not be the best option for many pets, as some will eat until they are ready to burst. Treats can be the culprit in many cases.  Those sad pitiful eyes sucker us every time…….I know my 4-legged children play their part well.   

Putting our pets on a diet can be a challenge. If your pet is overweight, a good look should be taken at what is being fed through out the day. Cutting out treats can be beneficial in decreasing the calories your pet is consuming.  If treats must happen then decrease the amount of kibble that is fed. Try treats with less calories such as popcorn(without all the buttery goodness), green beans, squash or zucchini. Increase your pet’s activity level; this also can increase our activity level, so it is a win win situation for everyone! 

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